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Gambling Addiction Impacts Decision-Making Area of Brain

Gambling Addiction Impacts Decision-Making Area of Brain
PsychCentral.com

A new research effort compares the similarities and differences in psychological profile and brain function among cocaine addicts and gambling addicts. In the study, investigators from the University of Granada determined that gambling addicts have ...A new research effort compares the similarities and differences in psychological profile and brain function among cocaine addicts and gambling addicts.


Gambling addiction happens to the best of us

“I was still emotionally 13. I had stopped growing emotionally. Addicts are always trying to get that immediate fix, trying to fill that void with outside things like drugs and shopping. It is a progressive disease which is unique for each person.

“Then I wanted more. I tried cocaine. It numbed me from fear. It made me more sociable. It was easy to get and it became a necessity for me.”

Kate went back to school for training and found a job she loved and excelled at. When not at work, she continued using alcohol and cocaine, which cost hundreds of dollars a month.


What is the Buddhist view of gambling?

There are six evil consequences in indulging in gambling:

(i) the winner begets hate,
(ii) the loser grieves for lost wealth,
(iii) loss of wealth,
(iv) his word is not relied upon in a court of law,
(v) he is despised by his friends and associates,
(vi) he is not sought after for matrimony; for people would say he is a gambler and is not fit to look after a wife [spouse]...

Gambling is discouraged by the Buddha, as we can see in the Sigalovada Sutta. What are the six channels for dissipating wealth which Buddha does not pursue?


Gambling rewires brain in a negative way

LAS VEGAS - The excitement and risk-taking of betting can change the brain's chemistry and create compulsive gamblers, a Harvard professor told casino executives Thursday during an American Gaming Association seminar.

"Addictive behaviors rewire the brain," Dr. Howard Shaffer, director of Harvard Medical School's Division on Addictions, told a group of about 100 hotel-casino officials at the Golden Nugget.